Plant Nite Succulents painting

Meet the Plant Nite Succulents

Succulents. Everyone loves these tiny, low-maintenance, and completely adorable plants, but how much do you know about the specific varieties of succulents and how to take care of them?

At Plant Nite, we try to offer a large variety of plants for you to choose from so that you can build your perfect terrarium. However, we do have some common varieties of succulents that you’re likely to see at your next event.

Plant Nite Succulents painting

Let’s meet the Plant Nite succulents, shall we?

Echeveria (“ech-e-ve-ria”)

Plant Nite Echeveria Succulents

Plant Nite Echeveria Succulents

A bit about the plant:

Echeveria is a rosette-forming succulent and comes in a rainbow of colors and types. Most Echeveria are summer growers. They can tolerate long dry periods without watering, but will grow stronger with more water during the summer months. Generally speaking, the more sun they get the better their colors and shape will be, but protect them from excessive sun during hot weather.

Where’s it from?

Native to the semi-desert areas of Central America.

How to take care of it:

This succulent likes full sun, but be careful to avoid sunlight changes and the full heat of the summer-afternoon sun. In the winter, put your echeveria in the window that faces the most natural sunlight. They’ll start to stretch without enough light.

When watering your plant, water the soil around it and not the plant itself. Give it enough water to completely moisten the soil. Don’t add more water to the plant until you see the soil is fully dry again.

 

Sempervivum (“semp-urr-VIVE-um”)

Plant Nite Sempervivum Succulents

Plant Nite Sempervivum Succulents

A bit about the plant:

Sempervivum look a lot like Echeveria, but the ends of their rosettes are pointier and they tend to change color throughout the year.

They are “monocarpic” (meaning that they bloom once, then die), but they normally produce several generations of offsets (or ‘chicks’) before that happens. The Latin translation of sempervivum means “ever living.”

Where’s it from?

Sempervivum “exist from Morocco to Iran, through the mountains of Iberia, the Alps, Carpathians, Balkan mountains, Turkey, the Armenian mountains, in the northeastern part of the Sahara Desert, and the Caucasus.” (source = Wikipedia)

How to take care of it:

Sempervivum can be placed in full sun or partial sun areas of your home. Avoid placing this succulent in an area that gets too hot during the day.

Like other succulents, sempervivum’s roots will rot if they sit for too long in a damp environment. When you water your plant, be sure to fully moisten the soil without allowing it to get too much water. Allow the soil to fully dry before watering again.

You can cut or snap off the “chicks” of this plant and replant them in a new pot to propagate. During the growing season (summer), each sempervivum will multiple by four. Make sure to remove the original plant once it has died.

 

Sedum (“see-dum”)

Plant Nite Sedum Succulent

A bit about the plant:

Sedum succulents are also known as “stonecrops.” There are numerous types of sedum, all of which have fleshy, succulent leaves.

The term “sedum” is taken from the Latin word “sedo” meaning “to sit”—this probably refers to their generally ground-covering nature and the way they tend to sit on rocks, walls, and other seemingly uninviting places.

FUN FACT: They attract butterflies. Put your plant outside during the warmer months.

Where’s it from?

This plant is found primarily in the Northern Hemisphere.

How to take care of it:

Sedum are one of the most hardy varieties of succulents and will thrive wherever you place them in your home. Just be sure to not overwater.

 

Graptopetalum (“grap-toh-PET-al-um”)

Plant Nite Graptopetalum Succulent

A bit about the plant:

Graptopetalum have leaves that vary in color from silver-grey to pink to waxy green and are often speckled. They all have thick leaves forming rosettes with star-shaped flowers from white to pink on long stems.

Where’s it from?

Graptopetalum are native to Mexico and the southern US.

How to take care of it:

This succulent requires lots of sun in order to look its best. Be sure to put in an area of your home that gets direct sun during the day. Don’t overwater or the roots will die.

 

Jade (“jay-de”)

Plant Nite Finger Jade Succulent

A bit about the plant:

The jade plant is an extremely popular succulent houseplant. They have a shrub-like form with thick branches and smooth, oval-shaped leaves. Sometimes called the money plant or dollar plant, these plants were once thought to bring good luck to their owners—so, they were often given as housewarming gifts.

Where’s it from?

Jade is native to South Africa and Mozambique, and is common as a houseplant worldwide. (credit – Wikipedia)

How to take care of it:

Place your jade plant in an area of your home where it can get full sun during the day.

Jade’s roots will rot if they sit for too long in a damp environment. Don’t water this plant on a schedule, but rather check the soil’s dampness. If the top of the soil is dry, it’s time to water. If not, leave it alone.

 

Aloe (“al-oh”)

Plant Nite Aloe Succulent Plant

A bit about the plant:

Over 450 species of Aloe have been described with diverse forms and sizes. Aloe plants typically have a waxy surface on their leaves. The popular aloe vera plant is known for its medicinal qualities and can be found in many homes across North America.

Where’s it from?

Aloe is native to tropical and southern Africa, Madagascar, Jordan, the Arabian Peninsula, and various islands in the Indian Ocean (Mauritius, Réunion, Comoros, etc.). A few species have also become naturalized in other regions. (Source – Wikipedia)

How to take care of it:

Aloe thrives in areas with full sun. Don’t water this plant on a schedule. Rather, check its soil dampness on a regular basis and water when the soil is dry to the touch. Don’t overwater or the plant’s roots will rot.

Haworthia (“hay-WOR-thee-uh”)

Plant Nite Haworthia Succulent Plant

A bit about the plant:

Haworthia is related to aloe and can be easy to mis-categorize. They don’t grow as large as aloe and are very slow growing so they can be clumped close to other plants in your terrarium.

This plant has thick, fleshy leaves filled with a translucent jelly. They vary greatly in size, color (usually green, but sometimes brownish), and form. Many have attractively patterned leaves.

Where is it from?

Haworthia are native to South Africa.

How to take care of it:

Keep this plant in bright light, but not direct sunlight. Water generously during the summer months and less so in the winter. Don’t allow water to collect on the plant. Instead, water the soil until it’s damp.

 

What’s your favorite succulent? Do you mix and match or do you choose all the same plants in your terrarium?

Share your photos with us on Instagram by using #plantnite.

Haven’t been to Plant Nite? What are you waiting for? See our upcoming events by visiting PlantNite.com.

 

Print Friendly

There are no comments yet

Why not be the first

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *